Belt Loops

Requirements and Mr. Ricard's annotation on how they could be done…

Art

  1. Make a list of common materials used to create visual art compositions.
  2. Demonstrate how six of the following elements of design are used in a drawing: lines, circles, dots, shapes, colors, patterns, textures, space, balance, or perspective.
  3. Identify the three primary colors and the three secondary colors that can be made by mixing them. Show how this is done using paints or markers. Use the primary and secondary colors to create a painting.

A single scout with an interest in Art (Andrew Wittenmyer?) could run this.

Astronomy

  1. Demonstrate how to focus a simple telescope or binoculars. (A local astronomy club may be a resource for this activity.)
  2. Draw a diagram of our solar system—identify the planets and other objects.
  3. Explain the following terms: planet, star, solar system, galaxy, the Milky Way, black hole, red giant, white dwarf, comet, meteor, moon, asteroid, star map and universe.

A single scout could run this.

Chess

  1. Identify the chess pieces and set up a chess board for play.
  2. Demonstrate the moves of each chess piece to your den leader or adult partner.
  3. Play a game of chess.

A single scout could run this.

Computers

  1. Explain these parts of a personal computer: central processing unit (CPU), monitor, keyboard, mouse, modem, and printer.
  2. Demonstrate how to start up and shut down a personal computer properly.
  3. Use your computer to prepare and print a document.

Video Games

  1. Explain why it is important to have a rating system for video games. Check your video games to be sure they are right for your age.
  2. With an adult, create a schedule for you to do things that includes your chores, homework, and video gaming. Do your best to follow this schedule.
  3. Learn to play a new video game that is approved by your parent, guardian, or teacher.

I can imagine doing Computers and Video Games together. Computers they can finish (write and print out their games/chores schedule). For Video Games, the game they could learn could be one the scouts have written in the Video Game sessions and they would finish the belt loop later at home by following the schedule!

Language and Culture

  1. With your parent’s or adult partner’s permission, talk with someone who grew up in a different country than you did. Find out what it was like and how it is different from your experience.
  2. Learn 10 words that are in a different language than your own.
  3. Play two games that originated in another country or culture.

Mr Ricard has a friend who grew up in the Chech Republic who can come. The second would not be hard for a scout to teach the cubs. The games would not be hard — Mr Ricard could easily track some down (he can think of a pair of Native American games off the top of his head).

Map and Compass

  1. Show how to orient a map. Find three landmarks on the map
  2. Explain how a compass works.
  3. Draw a map of your neighborhood. Label the streets and plot the route you take to get to a place that you often visit.

A scout could easily teach the first two. The third the cubs could do with the aid of their parents who will be with them as they do this at the meeting.

Photography

  1. Point out the major features of a camera to your den or family and explain the function of each part. Parts could include film, lens, shutter, power on and off, zoom, battery, flash, display panel, case, settings, etc.
  2. Discuss with your den leader or adult partner, the benefits and contributions photography makes to modern life. Report what you learned to your den or family.
  3. Using a camera, take at least 10 pictures of your family, pet, or scenery; show these to your den

The first two are easy to do. Mr Ricard can easily teach a Boy Scout if need be and loan any amount of gear for this. The last may be a homework assignment to do with their family.

Weather

  1. Make a poster that shows and explains the water cycle.
  2. Set up a simple weather station to record rainfall, temperature, air pressure, or evaporation for one week.
  3. Watch the weather forecast on a local television station. Discuss with an adult family member what you heard and saw. Follow up by discussing the accuracy of the forecast.

First two can easily be done at the session. The recording of the second and the third would be homework.
They would MAKE the weather station at the session — either a hygrometer (humidity) using a pair of thermometers, a shoe lace and a cup or water OR a air pressure with a balloon, a jar, a straw and a piece of paper.

Science

  1. Explain the scientific method to your adult partner.
  2. Use the scientific method in a simple science project. Explain the results to an adult.
  3. Visit a museum, a laboratory, an observatory, a zoo, an aquarium, or other facility that employs scientists. Talk to a scientist about his or her work.

Wildlife Conservation

  1. Explain what natural resources are and why it's important to protect and conserve them.
  2. Make a poster that shows and explains the food chain. Describe to your den what happens if the food chain becomes broken or damaged.
  3. Learn about an endangered species. Make a report to your den that includes a picture, how the species came to be endangered, and what is being done to save it.
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